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20130104
20130112
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administration has now restored the civil rights of more virginians than any other administration in the history of virginia. [applause] here is the plan. here in virginia, in the cradle of democracy, we enact policies that actually work. in washington, we see debt, taxes, delays, blank, and this function. but here in virginia, we see results, solutions, job growth, surpluses, and cooperation. what a difference 9 miles can make. -- 90 miles can make. virginia is ranked as america's most livable state and the best day in which to make a living. i think you will know that every other major national business publications puts virginia in the top three best states in which to do business. while that is all good, there are many areas of believe we must play a much stronger foundation for the future of our commonwealth. this session, i am asking you to work with me to get a few big things done that i believe will create more jobs and more opportunities for our people. when you leave here on time, in 45 days, i want to be able to report to our citizens that our schools are on the way to being the most
. during the civil rights movement he was kind of a hero of mine. much more so than martin luther king, because i was quite of a radical as a young person, and i was the one that thought we should shall overcome is not a effective way of gaining civil rights. i think i i thought that more confrontation was needed. >> host: what made you a radical? what does it mean? >> guest: i think a radical, -- i'm still a radical today. that is i believe that a radical is any person who believes in the official liberty and individual freedom and limited government. that makes you a radical. and i have always been a -- person who believe that people should not we are interfere with me. i should be able to do my own thing as long as i don't violate the rights other people. >> host: who is the difference of following malcom x. omar tin luther king? >> host: well, at that time i thought martin luther king was too much a compriseer. i was willing to demand people in my career in the army was a part of that vision of confronting racial discrimination. >> host: how tall are you? >> guest: six foot fight.
of that and of the civil rights movement i was just a junkie by the time i was 9-years-old i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy and when i was 10i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay running for the mayor of new york but i wouldn't work for him at the headquarters, i want to the liberal party come on new york you could run on to. i was handed out leaflets on the street corner in new york, and some woman felt this was cute this ely handing out leaflets, and she asked me why they make the case for lindsey and got an early start of my political career and made the case against the opponent as well. we to get back to the liberal party headquarters and open it up and there were all these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills and so in one of my early lessons in politics, the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughnuts. [applause] >> you also sold a bumper stickers. >> those of us that have lived through it remember that is a time of great idealism and the campaign was infused with idealism as tragically as it ended, and wh
top-down pressure. sometimes it happens by movements like civil rights moment or right to vote for women in this country and sometimes it has to come from top down change. when that top down change is perceived to be efficiently enforced, then the exploiter has to adapt. what you see with forms of slavery today there are laws, there are penalties. by in large they are not perceived to be effectively active and enforced so the exploiter does not have to adapt too much or adapt just enough to avoid identification. >> thank you for a stimulating presentation. i want to get your reaction to the idea in general terms that maybe the diagnosis is only as good as the remedy it prescribes. in a particular way of asking that question, i would like to hear you say what your study on the shrimp supply chain suggests about an appropriate remedy for the exploitation that we're seeing there. and secondly, in more conceptual terms, all related to remedies. if you excuse me asking more than one question relating to different parts of your presentation. secondly, whether in conceptual terms it m
group of prisoners in new york, persons incarcerated through civil commitment without a right to a hearing beforehand or to a lawyer or right to confront accusers? and with rules of evidence suspended? this and no right to a lawyer afterward, after the person's rights are compromised and their credibility especially? is anyone looking into the constitutional violations? >> yes. the american -- the aclu has actually been very active on this issue, but the united states supreme court several terms ago, actually, issued a ruling that really limited the due process rights of those in civil commitments and really rooked at it, contemplated it as an extension of the existing criminal sentence. and so, but it hasn't stopped the litigation, but there is a lot of work that needs to be done still on civil commitment issues. and so that's -- it's kind of an ongoing project, and it exists a lot in a host of different contexts. i don'ti don't know if you're tg about a specific context, but for sex offenses, people committed for mental, because of mental illnesses and there are a range of i
active as civil rights laws. so it influences private law. so there could be a market for privacy. so they come along and say we will make it easier for you. and then facebook had to modify things and so forth. so what i am suggesting is a type of touchstone. before i buy an iphone, i give consideration to all the security. anywhere you go on the web, when it's not protected -- if you think about things like that the people might hold as private. >> you do a lot of coverage around the intersection of technology. does this seem like a real step forward to you? can you talk about your reaction? >> well, i think it speaks to the problems at this point. a lot of judges interpret the law around these technologies and don't always understand the technology. many have found that there are expressions are under around her e-mail and law enforcement can only get that technological issue straightened out. many would say that it is upsetting. in terms of trying to apply everything -- i mean, the constitution is supposed to have businesses not be able to look at a facebook page when they are maki
and handed him a protest note expressing serious concern over the matter. >> human rights groups say it's time for the government in nepal to improve the rule of law and live up to the terms of reconciliation as part of the peace deal that ended the civil war. >> these violations cannot escape. we have been suffering from this problem of impunity in nepal, especially those crimes that took place during conflict. >> a u.n. report documented more than 9,000 cases of human rights violations by both government forces and maoist insurgents during the civil war that ended in 2006. a promise truth and reconciliation commission has not yet emerged nor has the law been changed to recognize torture as a crime. human rights watch says colonel kumar lama's arrest in britain sends out a warning to those accused of serious crimes that they cannot escape justice. >> a man's been arrested in northern ireland after shots were apparently fired at police. nine police officers were injured during overnight clashes inble fast and violence follows weeks of protest over a decision not fly the union flag all y
administration. i would also point out, wolf, that john mccain is on the same side as the liberal civil rights group the aclu in this. they are raising the same kinds of questions. even though in the past, brennan has said that he opposes these enhanced interrogation techniques. >> we'll watch these confirmation hearings every step of the way. >> should be interesting, both of them. >> low flying helicopters have people in some of the country's biggest cities asking questions. the answers have to do with preparations for a possible terrorist attack. using radioactive dirty bombs. >>> plus, before we get to that, we have some new details emerging about the colorado theater shootings, including the suspect's strange behavior once he was caught. uncer ] when was the last time something made your jaw drop? campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. to help protect your eye health as you age... would you take it? well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's
like civil rights movement or getting the right to vote for women in this country, and sometimes it has to come from top-down change. when that top-down change is perceived to be efficiently enforced, then the exploiter has to adapt. what you see with forms of slavery today there are laws, there are penalties. buy and large they are not perceived to be efficiently enforced, so that the exploiter doesn't have to adapt too much or just enough evade identification. >> thank you for a stimulating presentation. i want to get your reaction to the idea in general terms that maybe the diagnosis is only as good as the remedy it prescribes. as a more particular way of asking that question, i'd like to hear you say what your study of the shrimp supply chain suggests about appropriate remedy for the exploitation that we're seeing there. and secondly, in more conceptual terms, all related to remedies. if you excuse me asking more than one question relating to different parts of your presentation. secondly, whether in conceptual terms it might not make more sense to draw a line between slavery and ot
. in a statement, he said the protesters have the constitutional right to demonstrate. he also called on his partners to help preserve civil peace. but he shifted the blame on to parliament, and called on it to do with protesters' demands. but the mass rally seemed to have expanded. friday marked one of the biggest days of demonstrations that have taken part in the last two weeks in at least 15,000 cities across the country. they are calling for equality and the end to the targeting of zunis. when nothing less. -- sunnis, nothing less. >> a prominent shiite cleric reached out, to a mosque in baghdad. he also went to the catholic church attack in 2010 by sunni fighters. >> we have learned a big lesson from this church and our brother christians in iraq. want to return to peace than confront the terrorists who want to split religions in iraq. >> the leaders of sudan and south sudan are meeting in addis about a -- abbaba to negotiate border disputes. pseudonym and south sudan came close to war last year over the disputes. both accused each other of supporting rebels in each other's territories.
civil society. one that is demanding better government. it did so a year ago regarding corruption and now asking for basic rights for women. in a way, this is india's arab spring. but it needs to sustain itself. and to lead to real reform and change. this indian spring will only work out better than the arab spring if its national leaders recognize the need for radical and thorough change in their country. up next, a look at the fiscal cliff deal in washington from the eyes of two great british economists and journalists. ack ! humans -- we are beautifully imperfect creatures living in an imperfect world. that's why liberty mutual insurance has your back with great ideas like our optional better car replacement. if your car is totaled, we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. call... and ask one of our insurance experts about it today. hello?! we believe our customers do their best out there in the world, and we do everything we can to be there for them when they need us. [car alarm blaring] call now and also ask about our 24/7 support and service. call... and lock in
admitted that he traveled to libya several times during the civil war but has denied any connection to the benghazi attacks. so right now nobody in custody that we know for sure was involved in that attack. frustrating for u.s. officials. >> so is he still being held? >> not clear whether he's still being held. right now it looks like there's nobody in custody that we're sure was involved at least as a suspect in that attack and it's very frustrating. >> a lot of work to bring those folks to justice. brian, thanks very much. >>> lawmakers here in washington want to hear from the secretary of state hillary clinton as soon as possible about the benghazi attack. we're just learning she will now testify on capitol hill the week of january 21st. her testimony had to be rescheduled after her bout with a stomach virus, a concussion, and later a blood clot in her head. let's bring in elise labott. >> wolf, it will be the week of january 21st. president obama's inauguration is on the 20th. it may not be exactly the same day after the inauguration. the committee staffers on the senate foreign
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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